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What is the cost of colour lens?

Wearing color contact lenses can completely transform your look. Colored contacts come in a wide variety of vibrant shades and effects to match any style. But before jumping in to try a fun new eye color, it’s important to understand the costs involved.

Color Contact Lens Pricing

The price for color contacts can range quite a bit based on the brand, lens type, and retailer. Here are some general guidelines on pricing:

  • Disposable Color Contacts: $15-$50 per pair
  • 1-2 Week Color Contacts: $20-$75 per pair
  • 1 Month Color Contacts: $30-$100 per pair
  • 3-6 Month Color Contacts: $60-$200 per pair
  • Yearly Color Contacts: $100-$300 per pair

Disposable color contacts are meant to be worn once and thrown away. They offer the lowest upfront cost, but are not very economical if you wear colored contacts regularly. Extended wear contacts that can be used for weeks or months at a time require a higher initial investment, but end up being cheaper in the long run.

Factors Affecting Color Contact Lens Cost

Several factors play into the pricing for colored contact lenses, including:

  • Brand – Well-known brands like Acuvue, Air Optix, and FreshLook cost more than generic or designer brands.
  • Retail Outlet – Lenses purchased directly from your eye doctor tend to cost more than online retailers.
  • Lens Technology – Special lens features like breathability, UV protection, and premium comfort increase the price.
  • Lens Design – More intricate lens patterns, special effects, and vivid shades are more expensive.
  • Package Size – Buying lenses in bulk packages saves money compared to individually-priced pairs.
  • Your Prescription – Prescription color contacts that correct vision are more costly than non-prescription lenses.

Ways to Save on Color Contacts

Here are some tips to get the most savings on your colored contact lens purchase:

  • Buy from an online retailer like Lens.com rather than directly from your eye doctor
  • Sign up for retailer rewards programs and join mailing lists for discount codes and sales alerts
  • Choose a lesser known brand like Oasys or Avaira for lower prices
  • Select lenses in plain, subtle colors instead of bold patterns or effects
  • Shop during seasonal sales around major holidays and events
  • Purchase lens packages in bulk for the best cost per pair
  • Use a flexible spending account (FSA) or health savings account (HSA) to pay with pre-tax dollars

Color Contact Lens Cost Comparison

To give a better idea of real-world colored contact lens pricing, here’s a breakdown from two top online retailers:

Lens Type Lens.com Price 1800Contacts Price
Freshlook Colorblends, 1-day $33.95 (2 lenses) $35.99 (6 lenses)
Air Optix Colors, 2-week $39.95 (6 lenses) $33.99 (6 lenses)
Dailies Total1, 1-month $84.95 (30 lenses) $79.99 (30 lenses)
Acuvue Define, 3-month $112.95 (6 lenses) $108.99 (6 lenses)
Air Optix Plus Hydraglyde, 1-year $192.95 (4 lenses) $196.99 (6 lenses)

As you can see, prices are very similar between the two retailers. Lens.com tends to have slightly lower prices overall, but discounts and bulk pricing at 1800Contacts help bring costs down. Shopping around is wise to find the best deals.

Additional Color Contact Expenses

Beyond the upfront cost of the lenses themselves, there are a few other expenses to factor in:

  • Contact lens solution – Proper cleaning and disinfecting is required to safely wear contacts. Expect to spend $10-$20 on solution each month if wearing dailies, or $15-$30 if wearing extended wear lenses.
  • Replacement insurance – Loss & replacement insurance costs around $20 annually. It provides lens replacement if a lens is damaged or lost.
  • Contact lens exams – An updated contact lens prescription is needed yearly, which may cost $50-$100 or more.
  • Extra doctor visits – Follow up exams after initial contact lens fitting may involve additional fees.

While not hugely expensive, these recurring costs definitely add up. So remember to budget accordingly!

Cost Comparison to Eyeglasses

How does the cost of colored contact lenses compare to eyeglasses? Here are the key differences:

  • Glasses have higher upfront cost for frame/lenses, average $100-$400.
  • But glasses last 1-2 years with proper care. Contacts must be continually replaced.
  • Glasses don’t require solution or replacement insurance fees.
  • But glasses may need optional lens coatings and addons for extra cost.
  • Both require routine eye exams but glasses exams may be cheaper.
  • Contacts offer wider variety of colors/effects vs colored glasses.

Overall, eyeglasses tend to be more cost effective long term. But contacts provide more dramatic color change. Weigh your priorities against the costs to choose the best vision option.

Is Color Contact Lens Insurance Worth it?

Contact lens replacement insurance provides coverage in case a lens is damaged or lost. Here are the pros and cons of purchasing replacement insurance:

Pros

  • Provides free lens replacement up to once a year
  • Convenient and affordable peace of mind
  • Covers manufacturer defects
  • Costs as little as $20 per year

Cons

  • Might not use the replacement each year
  • Can only replace one lost/damaged lens per year
  • Doesn’t cover lost or misplaced contact cases
  • Need to ensure it includes your specific lens brand

Ultimately, it comes down to your tendency to lose contacts and how important convenience is to you. The relatively low cost makes replacement insurance worth considering for most colored contact lens wearers.

Conclusion

The price range for colored contact lenses spans from $15 into the hundreds based on lens type, brand, retailer, and other factors. While disposable lenses offer lower per pair pricing, extended wear lenses provide the most value over time. Shopping sales, buying in bulk, choosing generic brands, and using pre-tax savings accounts can help minimize the costs.

Additional expenses like solution and insurance should also be factored in. But overall, color contacts still tend to be more affordable long-term compared to eyeglasses. Just be sure to follow your eye doctor’s recommendations carefully for proper health and safety when using color contact lenses.